Shot of happy young man posing with his pregnant wife at home

KEY TESTING INSIGHTS DURING YOUR PREGNANCY JOURNEY

Testing while expecting*

It’s very important to get early and regular prenatal care. And, laboratory testing assists your doctor in monitoring your pregnancy and the health of your baby. 

Blood and urine samples will be needed to support your first doctor’s appointment. Your blood can be collected in your doctor’s office or at a Labcorp patient service center. Our “Wait Where You’re Comfortable” Program allows patients to check in virtually and wait safely in their car, and when they are next in line to be drawn, they are texted or called. Samples will also be collected on later visits for testing as part of routine prenatal care.

Access your results

In most cases, your healthcare provider will notify you with your results. Labcorp Patient™ portal allows you to access lab results. You can also download our mobile app.

Have Questions?

We are here to help—please contact us at 1-800-848-4436 and select #4.

Learn about the testing your physician may order during each stage of your pregnancy

WEEK 1 TO END OF WEEK 12

First Trimester Testing

A number of lab tests are suggested for all women as part of routine prenatal care. These tests can help confirm that you are healthy as well as determine if you have risks for you and your baby. Talk to your doctor about what tests are right for you.

Young Asian woman holding home pregnancy test and looking cheerful. The longest wait ever. Life changing moment. Am I ready to be pregnant? Dream came true.
  • Learn more about first trimester testing

    Routine Prenatal Tests include:

       

      *Additional testing may be requested based on your background and risk for problems, with consent and in accordance with law.


        Genetic Screening

        Talk to your doctor about the benefits of genetic testing, which can provide important information on the health of your baby. Whether this is your first pregnancy or you are adding to your family, genetic testing can provide insights to help you better understand your health, and that of your future family.

         


         

        Carrier Screening

        Screening for you and your partner. Most babies are born healthy. However, everyone has genetic mutations which can be passed on to his or her baby. Carrier screening can help determine if your child is at risk for specific disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Carrier testing is usually performed on you first. If the test is positive, your partner should be tested.


         

        Non Invasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS/NIPT)

        Screening for your baby. With a simple routine blood draw early in your pregnancy, NIPS (NIPT) screening will check the genetic health of your baby and rule out some specific conditions that could affect your baby’s health and development.


         

        Maternal Serum Screening (part 1)

        Screening for your baby. As an alternative to genetic testing, maternal serum screening tests help determine if your child is at risk for specific disorders. Your provider may order one of an assortment of tests in your first-trimester screen, sometimes combined with testing in a later semester


         

        Genetic Counseling

        Genetic information and knowledge is changing rapidly, and understanding your genetic testing choices can be complicated, so it is important to have a trusted source for gaining answers to your questions.

        Our expert, board-certified genetic counselors work with you and your doctor to help you understand your genetic risks and testing options. You may talk with a genetic counselor when you are considering genetic testing, or to discuss your genetic testing results.

      WEEK 13 TO END OF WEEK 26

      Second Trimester Testing

      A number of lab tests are suggested for all women as part of routine prenatal care. These tests can help confirm that you are healthy and determine if you have risks for you and your baby. Talk to your doctor about what tests are right for you.

      Couple looking pregnancy sonogram image
      • Learn more about second trimester testing

         

        Carrier Screening

        Screening for you and your partner. Most babies are born healthy. However, everyone has genetic mutations which can be passed on to his or her baby. Carrier screening can help determine if your child is at risk for specific disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Carrier testing is usually performed on you first. If the test is positive, your partner should be tested.


         

        Non Invasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS/NIPT)

        Screening for your baby. With a simple routine blood draw early in your pregnancy, NIPS (NIPT) screening will check the genetic health of your baby and rule out some specific conditions that could affect your baby’s health and development.


         

        Maternal Serum Screening (part 2)

        Screening for your baby. As an alternative to genetic testing, maternal serum screening tests help determine if your child is at risk for specific disorders. Your provider may order one of an assortment of tests in your first-trimester screen, sometimes combined with testing in a later semester


         

        Genetic Counseling

        Genetic information and knowledge is changing rapidly, and understanding your genetic testing choices can be complicated, so it is important to have a trusted source for gaining answers to your questions.

        Our expert, board-certified genetic counselors work with you and your doctor to help you understand your genetic risks and testing options. You may talk with a genetic counselor when you are considering genetic testing, or to discuss your genetic testing results.

      WEEK 27 TO END OF PREGNANCY

      Third Trimester Testing

      A number of lab tests are suggested for all women as part of routine prenatal care. These tests can help confirm that you are healthy and determine if you have risks for you and your baby. Talk to your doctor about what tests are right for you.

       Happy mixed race daughter hugging belly of her expecting mother while relaxing on couch at home. African girl listening to baby movements while embracing pregnant woman. Pregnant black mom and future sister relaxing together on sofa at home.
      • Learn more about second trimester testing

         

        Routine Prenatal Care

        A number of lab tests are suggested for all women as part of routine prenatal care. These tests can help confirm that you are healthy and determine if you have risks for you and your baby. Talk to your doctor about what tests are right for you

        • Gestational diabetes
        • Antibody screen if Rh negative
        • Complete Blood Count (CBC)
        • Group B streptococci (GBS)
        • HIV (high-risk patients rescreened) 
        • Syphilis (high-risk patients rescreened)

         

        Carrier Screening

        Screening for you and your partner. Most babies are born healthy. However, everyone has genetic mutations which can be passed on to his or her baby. Carrier screening can help determine if your child is at risk for specific disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Carrier testing is usually performed on you first. If the test is positive, your partner should be tested.


         

        Non Invasive Prenatal Screening (NIPS/NIPT)

        Screening for your baby. With a simple routine blood draw early in your pregnancy, NIPS (NIPT) screening will check the genetic health of your baby and rule out some specific conditions that could affect your baby’s health and development.


         

        Genetic Counseling

        Genetic information and knowledge is changing rapidly, and understanding your genetic testing choices can be complicated, so it is important to have a trusted source for gaining answers to your questions.

        Our expert, board-certified genetic counselors work with you and your doctor to help you understand your genetic risks and testing options. You may talk with a genetic counselor when you are considering genetic testing, or to discuss your genetic testing results.

      12 WEEKS AFTER BIRTH OF YOUR BABY

      Fourth Trimester Testing

      Post Delivery Care

      Sometimes, your doctor may suggest follow-up testing for new moms. Talk to your doctor about if additional tests might need to be performed on you.

      Feet of three newborn babies in a soft blanket. Heart in the legs of newborn triplets. Studio photography. High quality photo
      • Learn more about fourth trimester testing

         

        Postnatal Testing:

        • Diabetes Screening
           

         

        Your body after baby: The first 6 weeks

        Many things are happening in your body right after you have a baby. Some changes are physical and others are emotional. More information about common postpartum discomforts and what to do about them can be found here. Talk to your provider if you are worried about any discomforts or concerns.


         

        Well-baby exam: what to expect during routine checkups

        Testing for your newborn Pediatric Wellness

        At your child’s well-baby visit, the doctor or nurse will order screening tests that are most appropriate for your child’s age and risk factors. Pediatric preventative care tests help to detect risks for illness, disease, and other possible health concerns for your child.


         

        Infancy

        Newborn - 9 months

        Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive:​

        • Anemia risk assessment (4 months)1
        • Lead risk assessment (6 & 9 months)1
        • Tuberculosis risk assessment (By 1 month & 6 months)1  

        Other Assessments to be performed routinely, unless otherwise noted:

        • Vision1
        • Hearing1
        • Developmental Screening (9 months)1
        • Developmental Surveillance1
        • Psychosocial/Behavioral Assessment1

         

        Early Childhood

        12 months - 4 years

        Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive

        • Anemia test (12 months), risk assessment (15 months–4 years)1
        • Lead risk assessment (12, 18, 24 months; 3 & 4 years)*
        • Tuberculosis risk assessment (12 months, 24 months, 3 & 4 years)1
        • Dyslipidemia risk assessment (24 months & 4 years)1

        *Perform risk assessments as appropriate, based on universal screening requirements for patients with Medicaid or high prevalence areas. 

        For more on childhood tests and risk assessments, visit AAP.org.

        Other Assessments to be performed routinely, unless otherwise noted:

        • Vision1
        • Hearing1
        • Development screening: (18, 30 months)1
        • Development Surveillance (12, 15, 24 months)1
        • Psychosocial/ Behavioral Assessment1
        • Autism Spectrum Disorder Screening test (18 & 24 months)1

         

        Middle Childhood

        5 years - 10 years

        Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive:

        • Anemia risk assessment (5–10 years)1
        • Lead risk assessment (5 & 6 years)1
        • Tuberculosis risk assessment (5–10 years)
        • Dyslipidemia screening thereafter (9–10 years), continued risk assessment (6 & 8 years)1

        Other Assessments to be performed:

        • Vision1
        • Hearing1
        • Developmental Surveillance1
        • Psychosocial/Behavioral Assessment1

         

        Adolescence

        11 years - 21 years

        Tests & Risk Assessment to be performed with appropriate action to follow, if positive:

        • Anemia risk assessment annually1
        • Tuberculosis risk assessment annually1
        • Tobacco, Alcohol, or Drug Use risk assessment annually1 
        • Dyslipidemia screening (annually at 11 years and 17–21 years); risk assessment (annually between 12–16 years)1
        • HIV screening (annually at 15–18 years); risk assessment annually from 11–14 years and 19–21 years)1 
        • Sexually Transmitted Infections risk assessment annually 

        Other Assessments to be performed annually, unless otherwise noted:

        • Vision1
        • Hearing1 
        • Hearing: One time between 11–14 years, 15–17 years, and 18–21 years
        • Developmental Surveillance1
        • Psychosocial/ Behavioral Assessment1 

      Products from our partners

       

      Fresh Test Kit

      Gestational Diabetes Screening

      Gestational Diabetes Screening and your choice in glucose beverages.

      Labcorp patients now have a choice in glucose beverages. You may choose between a traditional glucose beverage (available through your physician or laboratory) or a natural Non-GMO option, called The Fresh Test™. This can be purchased at www.TheFreshTest.com.

      The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) between 24–28 weeks.4  To screen for GDM, you will take an initial glucose load test for which you will need to consume a 50-gram glucose beverage an hour prior to a plasma glucose test. The plasma glucose test is performed by appointment at one of Labcorp’s Patient Service Centers or your physician’s office. Order your glucose beverage today so that it arrives in time for your scheduled glucose load test appointment. 

      Gestational Diabetes affects 7% of pregnant women5. Uncontrolled GDM poses risks including, but not limited to, preterm birth, fetal anomalies, preeclampsia, macrosomia, neonatal hypoglycemia, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and a higher risk of developing diabetes post-partum4

      Please consult with your healthcare provider if you will be taking the 50-gram, 75-gram or 100-gram glucose test as they have different requirements.  

      References:

      1. American Academy of Pediatrics. Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Health Care. Updated February 2017.
         
      2. USPSTF A and B Recommendations. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Name/uspstf-a-and-b-recommendations. Accessed November 15, 2017.
         
      3. CDC Preventive Care for Adults. https://www.cdc.gov/prevention/index.html. Accessed November 15, 2017.
         
      4. Management of Diabetes in Pregnancy: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2019. Diabetes Care. 2019;42(Supplement 1):S165. doi:10.2337/dc19-S014

      5. March of Dimes. Gestational Diabetes. https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/gestational-diabetes.aspx. Accessed March 11, 2021.